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    Turkish Cookery Tips & Recipes

    Post  Admin on Sun Apr 24, 2011 8:17 pm

    Turkish cookery tips

    Posts: 100
    Wednesday, 12-01-10 12:13

    Hello Ladies

    I hope you don't mind me picking your brains but I just wondered if anyone had any good tips on cooking Turkish food. I have tried a few recipes I've found on the web but they don't always turn out that good. Does anyone have any tips or tricks they do when making a Turkish meal? I like all Turkish food from mezes to main meals so any tips would be appreciated.

    Thanks girls

    Babs

    Yes, I am snowed in too. Who would have guessed it?


    Adryath

    Posts: 58
    Wednesday, 12-01-10
    Have you tried any of the recipes from Binnurs Turkish cookbook website? They are usually quite good, although it never tastes quite the same as in Turkey whatever I do.


    strawberryxxx #2

    Posts: 2895
    Thursday,
    Hi Babs,

    I don't really make much Turkish food, though occasionally I do, and Ertie sometimes does. A friend of mine, Pat, she makes Turkish frequently, and everyone Turkish loves her cooking - so I'll ask her for some tips and pass them on to you.

    I have to be in the mood for Turkish food, and much of it tastes very similar (kebabs, casseroles etc) so it's not really my favourite food, although I do enjoy it sometimes. When people start off cooking Turkish food they always do Menemen for some reason!

    Anyway, I'll give you some of my recipes (and some of Ertie's).....

    MENEMEN! Ha ha!

    It's just scrambled eggs with peppers and tomatoes, but is tasty. I very occasionally make it for brunch. Some people add onions to it but I prefer it without.

    I just chop some red peppers into small pieces and fry them in a small saucepan in a little virgin olive oil and butter. Once they're almost cooked I add chopped tomatoes and fry for about a minute. I then add about 4 eggs (depending on size) salt and pepper, and scramble them with a wooden spoon. Make sure to turn them out before they're set - most important. Otherwise the heat will keep cooking them and they will become rubbery, so tip them out when they still look underdone. I sometimes sprinkle paprika on top for a little bit of extra colour.

    I'll do some for you a bit later.........we're just off to try and dig our way out of our igloo!

    Strawbs


    Thursday, 12-02-10
    I also like Binners recipes Aydrath, I think they are the best of the lot.

    Yvette



    Barbarababe #4

    Posts: 100
    Monday, 12-06-10
    Ladies

    Thanks for that link and recipe tip. I will be trying out the menemen tonight so wish me luck.

    Babs



    strawberryxxx #5

    Posts: 2895
    Monday, 12-06-10
    Hi Babs,

    Sorry to hear you had problems logging on - quite a few people seemed to have difficulty over the weekend. One of those glitches I guess.

    I hope your Menemen turns out well, and don't forget to serve it with hot crusty bread! Let me know how it turns out. I'll post some more recipes up soon - I don't know that many - but I do enjoy cooking when I'm in the mood and most of them turn out quite good. I do tend to tweak mine to suit my own taste, so they may not be true authentic Turkish recipes, but they're as near as.

    I'll do a quick one for Cacik for you - that's a really easy one to start off with.

    I always use thick natural yogurt (usually Greek) and all I do is grate some cucumber (with the skin left on) - so, say, you're making enough for 4 people you'd use half a large cucumber, then I plop that in a bowl. Some people drain the juice, but I don't bother as the thick yogurt stops it from becoming too runny. I then crush some garlic cloves - put in as many as you like according to taste - some people put in just one clove but I usually put in 3 (depends on how garlicky you like it) then I pour the yogurt into the bowl, add a little ground rock salt, ground black pepper, a couple of teaspoons of dried herbs - I use Thyme or Dill, but Mint is nice too - and then I stir it all around - then once it looks like Cacik I sprinkle some more Thyme over the top, a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, a tiny sprinkling of dried red chillies in the centre, and place a few mint leaves on top if I have them (makes it look decorative) or a couple of basil leaves and maybe a sprinkling of dried dill. Serve with crusty hot bread or crispy crackers. Oh! I stick a black olive in the centre too!

    It sounds fiddly, but takes 5 minutes to prepare - if that! I think you'll like it........

    Strawbs


    Barbarababe #6

    Posts: 100
    Monday, 12-06-10
    Thank you very much for your recipe Strawbs, I've eaten that before and liked it specially in the heat, I will give that a try this week as a side dish with lamb chops and the mint.

    Thankyou very much, you are very helpful.

    Babs

    electradiva

    Posts: 257
    Wednesday, 1
    I really think it helps if you have the Turkish products. If you don't live near somewhere that can source them, you could try this website:

    http://www.turkishsupermarket.co.uk/

    Admittedly I haven't used them but they look pretty good.


    yvette #8

    Posts: 216
    Wednesday, 12-08-10
    I find all my ingredients in morrisons, toms peppers chillies etc. They don't do sucuk or pepper paste or some of the nuts and spices but they do everything else I found.

    Yvette




    guveclover

    Posts: 419
    Friday,
    Just the word sucuk makes me urge. I can't bear the smell of the stuff, let alone the taste!

    I think as long as you've got some vegetable oil, onions, tomatoes, peppers, tomato puree, chilli flakes, rice, pasta, yogurt and a loaf of bread in you're well on the way to preparing a wide range of delicious Turkish dishes. Mmmmmm.

    Judith


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    Re: Turkish Cookery Tips & Recipes

    Post  Admin on Sun Apr 24, 2011 8:22 pm

    strawberryxxx #11

    Posts: 2895
    Saturday, 12-11-10
    Oh I hate sucuk too! It stinks and tastes utterly vile. I actually don't believe that all these women who claim to love it really do - they just make out they do - or they manage to convince themselves they do! It isn't suited to British people's palates at all - so I don't see how they could like it!

    The food industry spends millions on adapting foreign foods to suit British tastes - Indian food is a typical example - the reason being that the spices and flavours would not appeal to the average British palate, and so they tone them down, or just change the recipe and/or ingredients totally. Same with sucuk - it's far too overpowering and strong for the average Brit, and the actual flavour is revolting. I know you can get two types - beef or chicken - but I think they're made with donkey on the quiet! GOD knows what goes into them!

    Strawbs



    Barbarababe #12

    Posts: 100
    Saturday, 12-11-10
    Hello Ladies

    Strawbs I want to say thankyou for that yoghurt recipe with cucumber and garlic, it was so tasty, better than what I had in Turkey. My friend is not really keen on foreign food but even she raved about it and asked me for the recipe. I was well chuffed! I will be making the egg recipe tonight just before the X factor and I'll let you know how it turns out. Wish me luck!

    Babs



    strawberryxxx #13

    Posts: 2895
    Sunday, 12-12-10
    Hi Babs,

    Oh I'm glad you liked my cacik recipe!

    Ertie actually says mine is the best he's ever tasted - almost as good as his grandmother's! It is so easy to make, though!

    I hope your menemen turned out good last night - that's a doddle too! I'll post up some more of my recipes later - but we've just had brunch (had a very late night) and I'm absolutely stuffed! And I hate talking about food when I'm stuffed!

    Later.......

    Strawbs


    Barbarababe #14

    Posts: 100
    Sunday, 12-12-10
    Hello All

    I made the menemen tonight and had it with toast and it was really lovely. Thank you Strawbs. I am patting myself on my back here, usuallly my cooking comes out wrong but this is my second success. Bring on the recipes please! I had a great evening, spoke to my chap then my friend came over and we had our menemen with a glass of rose and then Matt won X factor. What a night!

    Babs



    strawberryxxx #15

    Posts: 2895
    Tuesday, 12-14-10
    Hi Babs

    Oh I'm glad it turned out well!

    Well done you!

    Strawbs



    porkchop #16

    Posts: 136
    Wednesday, 12-15-10
    I tried the mene and it wasnt bad as it goes but i forgot to put the peppers in, i only put in the onoins and put some chilli pepper salt on top, werent bad tho.i will give your one a go strawbs and see what its like.

    xx


    leese78 #17

    Posts: 84
    Wednesday, 12-15-10
    Hey Barbara,

    Not saying that Strawbs recipes aren't lovely, but you should also look at Binnurs Turkish cookbook on the internet (as Aydrath said!). I have got all my recipes from this and boyfriends family think I am fantastic (didn't you know British girls can't cook....we all have chefs you know!!!).

    I don't cook Turkish food very often when it is just us, we love curries, chillies, cottage pie etc, but Binnur has helped out in the past! Just waiting for his family to make the effort for me one day and perhaps ı will be welcomed by a nice Sunday roast from his sister!!! Ha yeah right!!

    Leese x

    strawberryxxx #18

    Posts: 2895
    Saturday, 12-18-10


    I don't think you'll ever get a decent roast out in Turkey. I can't speak for the whole of Turkey, but when I was out there for 2 years (on and off) I never managed to find a butcher or supermarket who sold decent meat. And I tried them all! In fact, I don't think they sell rib of beef - I think they cut their meat differently. I don't remember seeing topside, either - though I would only use topside at a push - you can't beat a large rib of beef on the bone roasted dark on the outside and all soft and pink inside! I think halal meat tastes different to ours.......maybe because they drain all the blood? And it's so much tougher, probably because the animal is so tense before they slit its throat.

    If I was still living in Turkey I would never bother cooking - it's so much easier (and cheaper) to eat out. Only trouble is it's all so similar........tomatoes, peppers, yogurt, pilav, spinach, aubergines and BEANS!

    Strawbs



    Meowcat #19

    Posts: 361
    Sunday, 12-19-10
    BREAD!!!!!!!


    strawberryxxx #20

    Posts: 2895
    Tuesday, 12-21-10
    Oh no, mustn't forget the bread! Haha!

    I have a local newsagent who gets bread in every Saturday, and it's fantastic! It's very light and crusty - I swear the baker is Turkish - it's just like the typical bread you buy in local shops in Turkey. It's really lovely. We always have bread in (and different varieties too) but with all this snow I'm throwing lots out to the birds. There's a sweet little robin who keeps popping up at the window - I love robins. And there's a couple of blackbirds too. I love all birds actually - except crows. I think they're horrible.

    Strawbs



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    Re: Turkish Cookery Tips & Recipes

    Post  Admin on Sun Apr 24, 2011 8:28 pm


    Public Forum. .Turkish cookery tips
    Author Comment
    Barbarababe #2

    Posts: 100

    Hello Leese

    Thankyou for that link to Binars food recipes, I took a look and they look very yummy. I want to start off gradually, I get a bit confused cooking foriegn food but the recipes Strawbs gave me was very easy to follow and turned out top notch. I will have to keep working at it, I might get a job as a chef in a Turkish taverna (only joking hehe)

    Strawbs do you have any tips on cooking that puffy Turkish bread? I would like to try that next and a sweet too would be good practice.

    Thanks girls

    Babs



    strawberryxxx #22

    Posts: 2895
    Friday, 12-31-10
    Hi again, Babs,

    I take it you mean the long puffy bread they serve hot, and is usually sprinkled with sesame seeds? Hmmm....I haven't tried cooking that yet. By the way, it's called Lavas (pronounced as 'lavash') It's my favourite dipping bread too, but you really need a large wood-burning stove to cook it properly. You could improvise and use a garden stove filled with wood, but it's all a bit tricky. I only eat lavas with meze, and there are a couple of good restaurants I know in London and Surrey who do great lavas, but a lot of Turkish restaurants don't seem to bother - so my guess is that it's hard work! Haha! It is lovely, though, and I think almost every restaurant Ertie and I went into up and down Turkey served us up lavas for free with our mezes. Personally, if I was doing meze at home I'd just buy some crackers for dipping! Or some really nice crusty bread, and I'd heat it up in the oven - I'm not crazy about pitta bread (in fact I don't think it's Turkish is it?) and I find it it a bit chewy if it isn't piping hot (I like CRUNCH) I do enjoy cooking, but I don't like hard work - and I think bread can be tricky - especially lavas, but I could be wrong. If you're only making it to dip into mezzes I'd be inclined to serve the mezze how they do in the authentic restaurants in Turkey. For example, really good restaurants often serve their Hummus hot and pour warm melted butter over it and then sprinkle it with nuts (pistachios usually) It sounds like heart attack material, and one dip is about a million cals haha, but it is absolutely gorgeous. Once eaten like that you won't want it any other way.

    Another heart attack material dessert is Kanafeh. Again, it's served hot and is about a million cals a bite (I swear I gained half a stone overnight eating that in Turkey!) but it is delicious. You need to buy some of that Kadayif pastry (it's like strings - similar to shredded wheat) you can buy it in most frozen counters of Turkish supermarkets. All you do is lay some in a small earthenware bowl (you'll use that as the serving dish) and cover it with unsalted butter. Bake it in the oven for about 10 minutes, then spread some cream cheese on top (Philadelphia will do) and cover with more of the stringy pastry. Put it back in the oven and cook for about 8 minutes. Meanwhile, make a syrup of water, sugar and rosewater, then sprinkle it liberally over the pastry and put it back in the oven for about 5 more minutes. You can also sprinkle orange food colouring on the top of the part-baked pastry - it just makes it look prettier. Once cooked sprinkle a handful of chopped pistachios and walnuts on top, and serve with thick clotted cream. Then call an ambulance - just in case! Nooo, it is lovely - really. But it is very very fattening. Makes a nice treat for a special occasion though.

    Strawbs










    Meowcat #23

    Posts: 361
    Thursday, 01-06-1
    Strewth..........................I never knew what kenafeh was and I know all the desserts! which region does it come from?


    yvette #24

    Posts: 216
    Thursday, 01-06-11
    I've never seen it in Turkey either but I did a search and is is a Turkish sweet. Sounds nice...I love rose flavour syrup. Must not think about food! No no no.

    Yvette



    Meowcat #25

    Posts: 361
    Monday, 01-10-11
    YOU MUST NOT THINK ABOUT FOOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


    porkchop #26

    Posts: 136
    Wednesday, 02-16-11
    Anyone here know how to make adana kebab? I looked online but seen lots of kinds so am not sure whats the best one?

    xx



    Deniz #27 [

    Posts: 86
    Thursday, 02-17-11
    strawberryxxx wrote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Oh I hate sucuk too! It stinks and tastes utterly vile. I actually don't believe that all these women who claim to love it really do - they just make out they do - or they manage to convince themselves they do! It isn't suited to British people's palates at all - so I don't see how they could like it!

    The food industry spends millions on adapting foreign foods to suit British tastes - Indian food is a typical example - the reason being that the spices and flavours would not appeal to the average British palate, and so they tone them down, or just change the recipe and/or ingredients totally. Same with sucuk - it's far too overpowering and strong for the average Brit, and the actual flavour is revolting. I know you can get two types - beef or chicken - but I think they're made with donkey on the quiet! GOD knows what goes into them!

    Strawbs

    Now i'm one of them ladies that does love sucuk, my kids love it too. Its gawgus fried in butter with an egg mmmmmmmmmmmmmm




    Deniz #28

    Posts: 86
    Thursday, 02-17-11
    heres a list of herbs and spices used in turkish cooking ( English to Turkish)
    Dill ..... DereotuMint .... NaneParsley .... MaydanozPaprika ..... KirmiziCinnamon .... TarcinMixed spices for meat balls ... Kofte bahariSomac ... SumakBay leaves ... DefneAllspice .... YenibaharCloves ... KaranfilRed peper ... Kirmizi biberBlack pepper .... Kara biberThyme .... KekikCummin ... KimyonSaffron..... Safran




    Deniz #29

    Posts: 86
    Thursday, 02-17-11
    strawberryxxx wrote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ,
    I'll do a quick one for Cacik for you - that's a really easy one to start off with.

    I always use thick natural yogurt (usually Greek) and all I do is grate some cucumber (with the skin left on) - so, say, you're making enough for 4 people you'd use half a large cucumber, then I plop that in a bowl. Some people drain the juice, but I don't bother as the thick yogurt stops it from becoming too runny. I then crush some garlic cloves - put in as many as you like according to taste - some people put in just one clove but I usually put in 3 (depends on how garlicky you like it) then I pour the yogurt into the bowl, add a little ground rock salt, ground black pepper, a couple of teaspoons of dried herbs - I use Thyme or Dill, but Mint is nice too - and then I stir it all around - then once it looks like Cacik I sprinkle some more Thyme over the top, a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, a tiny sprinkling of dried red chillies in the centre, and place a few mint leaves on top if I have them (makes it look decorative) or a couple of basil leaves and maybe a sprinkling of dried dill. Serve with crusty hot bread or crispy crackers. Oh! I stick a black olive in the centre too!

    It sounds fiddly, but takes 5 minutes to prepare - if that! I think you'll like it........

    Strawbs
    Strawberry the way i was shown, and do it now is you removed the cucumbers skin and instead of grating it its diced into small cubes.
    In the summer ice cubes are added to keep it cool while its at the table

    strawberryxxx #30

    Posts: 2895
    Friday, 02-18-11
    Hi Denise,

    Yes I've seen cacik done the way you've described, but I prefer it with the cucumber grated and the skin left on. I think it tastes more 'cucumbery' and the skin adds colour. And I prefer the texture when it's grated, though having it the chopped way ( and with ice cubes) is more refreshing in the summer. I've noticed in Greece they tend to chop their cucumbers for cacik (or should I say Tzaziki! tut tut )

    I suppose it's all down to personal preference, really. Actually, I'm going to make some today (I need a garlic overload for my sore throat and cough!) When I make it just for the two of us I put about 3 cloves of garlic in it, but a lot of people find that too much, so when I've ever made it for other people I only use about one clove.

    Do you use thyme in yours? Ertie insists upon it.....".don't forget the tymeeee!" I've no idea what he'd do without his 'tymeee'!

    I always sprinkle dill on top, too, or sometimes mint. By the way, what yogurt do you use to make yours? The thick one or normal one?

    Strawbs



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    Re: Turkish Cookery Tips & Recipes

    Post  Admin on Sun Apr 24, 2011 8:34 pm

    #31 [

    Posts: 2895
    Friday, 02-18-11
    Hi again, Denise - I've just remembered something!

    Reading your list of herbs/spices they use in Turkey I notice coriander isn't there - and I know that a lot of people say that Turks don't use it. But when I lived in Fethiye I used to buy (what I thought!) was coriander! It looked like it - and tasted like it! And I've seen it here in Turkish restaurants, too! I'm wondering if it isn't coriander at all! Could it be flat-leaf parsley? I would have bet on it that it was coriander, but people do tell me they don't have it in Turkey. So I'm quite confussed!

    Strawbs



    Deniz

    Posts: 86
    Friday, 02-18-11 13:59

    Hi Strawb'
    You have been told correctly coriander is not used or to be found in Turkey, what you found that looked like it was fresh flat leaf parsley ( they dont sell the curly type of Parsley but in saying that they may do now ).Fresh veg, meat etc will always taste different out their compared to what we use in England. The water, soil the veg are grown in, butter used to cook certain meals is different.
    The cacik i make is garnished with just mint and salt. The yoghurt used is the thick creamy TOTAL one, but making your own yoghurt is easy enough to do ( yep i know how to make yoghurt too lol )
    At home Turkish meals are cooked alot, the only English meals i do or am any good at is the Sunday roasts or microwave meals

    strawberryxxx #33

    Posts: 2895
    Friday, 02-25-11 13:20

    Hi Denise,

    I think the organic fruit and vegetables taste better in Turkey, and the peaches and figs picked straight from the tree really are delicious. But that applies to anywhere in the world really. I do think that a certain amount of psychology comes into play, too. You won't find much organic produce in the hotels or restaurants in Turkey - it's all farm grown and sprayed with pesticides etc. The fruit and vegetables in the supermarkets in Turkey are nothing special by any means, and some of their produce is quite poor. But eaten in the right setting - overlooking the beach at sunset, for example - and it can taste quite different!

    Unless you stay in a village in Turkey or are lucky enough to grow your own out there, most of the fruit and vegetables are the same as what we buy in the UK. In fact, Turkey exports thousands of tons of fruit and veg to the UK: tomatoes, aubergines, figs, lemons, mandarins, oranges, nuts etc They don't export many peaches as they don't transport well; neither do they sell many cucumbers as British people prefer the long ones.

    A lot of people think that all the fruit and vegetables in Turkey are organic, but that's not the case at all. Some of the markets sell some nice produce, but even a lot of that is bought from farms - it isn't homegrown or anything.

    As far as the meat's concerned in Turkey - I really don't like it. The lamb and chicken is OK, but I thought the beef was terrible. I used to take steaks over with me from England - I missed it so much! I did have a few steaks in Turkey which were good, but even those (in expensive hotels) were nowhere near as tender or full of flavour as a good old Angus Rib-Eye or Fillet Steak. You can't beat Scotch beef - you just can't. Besides, I think the fact that they drain all the blood of animals in Turkey - and they don't hang the meat to mature - is another factor why it's tough and tasteless. Most of the steaks I had in Turkey always had a sauce come with them (peppercorn or red wine & mushroom) and they were always tasty - but that was more down to the sauce than the meat. The best steak I ever had was at the Ece Saray in Fethiye - it was a small fillet with Bearnaise butter on top - oh that was lovely! I think the fish in the market in Fethiye is wonderful! REALLY fresh and I could eat that every day. I love fish.

    I see you use the Greek yogurt for your cacik (tut tut) Sometimes Ertie buys the thick Turkish yogurt (the one with the yellowish cream on top) and that is delicious! It's imported from Turkey, and although similar to the TOTAL - is much nicer. God, ever since I started thinking about food I can't stop! I don't think I could be doing with making my own yogurt, though I did get a yogurt-maker one Christmas from someone years ago - but I never used it. Does home-made yogurt taste different to shop bought?

    Strawbs




    strawberryxxx #34

    Posts: 2895
    Friday, 02-25-11 13:
    Hi Denise,

    I think the organic fruit and vegetables taste better in Turkey, and the peaches and figs picked straight from the tree really are delicious. But that applies to anywhere in the world really. I do think that a certain amount of psychology comes into play, too. You won't find much organic produce in the hotels or restaurants in Turkey - it's all farm grown and sprayed with pesticides etc. The fruit and vegetables in the supermarkets in Turkey are nothing special by any means, and some of their produce is quite poor. But eaten in the right setting - overlooking the beach at sunset, for example - and it can taste quite different!

    Unless you stay in a village in Turkey or are lucky enough to grow your own out there, most of the fruit and vegetables are the same as what we buy in the UK. In fact, Turkey exports thousands of tons of fruit and veg to the UK: tomatoes, aubergines, figs, lemons, mandarins, oranges, nuts etc They don't export many peaches as they don't transport well; neither do they sell many cucumbers as British people prefer the long ones.

    A lot of people think that all the fruit and vegetables in Turkey are organic, but that's not the case at all. Some of the markets sell some nice produce, but even a lot of that is bought from farms - it isn't homegrown or anything.

    As far as the meat's concerned in Turkey - I really don't like it. The lamb and chicken is OK, but I thought the beef was terrible. I used to take steaks over with me from England - I missed it so much! I did have a few steaks in Turkey which were good, but even those (in expensive hotels) were nowhere near as tender or full of flavour as a good old Angus Rib-Eye or Fillet Steak. You can't beat Scotch beef - you just can't. Besides, I think the fact that they drain all the blood of animals in Turkey - and they don't hang the meat to mature - is another factor why it's tough and tasteless. Most of the steaks I had in Turkey always had a sauce come with them (peppercorn or red wine & mushroom) and they were always tasty - but that was more down to the sauce than the meat. The best steak I ever had was at the Ece Saray in Fethiye - it was a small fillet with Bearnaise butter on top - oh that was lovely! I think the fish in the market in Fethiye is wonderful! REALLY fresh and I could eat that every day. I love fish.

    I see you use the Greek yogurt for your cacik (tut tut) Sometimes Ertie buys the thick Turkish yogurt (the one with the yellowish cream on top) and that is delicious! It's imported from Turkey, and although similar to the TOTAL - is much nicer. God, ever since I started thinking about food I can't stop! I don't think I could be doing with making my own yogurt, though I did get a yogurt-maker one Christmas from someone years ago - but I never used it. Does home-made yogurt taste different to shop bought?

    Strawbs


    porkchop #35

    Posts: 136
    Saturday, 02-26-11
    Tescos and morrisons sell turkish yoghurt if you fancy it.

    xx



    strawberryxxx #36

    Posts: 2895
    Monday, 02-28-11
    Hi Porkchop,

    I don't think any supermarkets sell Turkish yogurt - you'll only find it in Turkish supermarkets. You'll find Greek yogurt in supermarkets, though. What make was it that you saw?

    Strawbs



    porkchop #37

    Posts: 136
    Tuesday, 03-01-11

    Strawbs i saw it in morrisons i think, i cant remember the make but im sure it was turkish, i will look for it nxt time i go

    xx


    ErinJ.turkishlove #38

    Posts: 81
    Tuesday, 03-01-11
    I've bought and eaten coriander in Turkey......it was known as cilantro (as in the US).

    ErinJ


    strawberryxxx #39

    Posts: 2895
    Tuesday, 03-01-11
    Hi ErinJ,

    That's interesting because I could have sworn I had coriander in Turkey, too. I remember buying (what I thought was) coriander from the market stalls in Fethiye. It certainly looked like coriander - and it tasted like it. But I have heard people say it's hard to find in Turkey, which seems strange considering it's both a Mediterranean and Asian herb.

    I'm glad you've had it too in Turkey - otherwise I'd think I was going bonkers!

    Strawbs



    Meowcat #40 [

    Posts: 361
    Saturday, 03-05-11
    Coriander is used in Indian and Moroccan cooking isn't it?

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    Re: Turkish Cookery Tips & Recipes

    Post  Admin on Sun Apr 24, 2011 8:40 pm

    #41 [url] [-]

    Posts: 100
    Saturday, 03-05-11 17:00

    Hello Ladies

    Coriander is very good for bad breath or after you've eaten garlic. You just pluck a few leaves and nibble on them and your breath becomes all sweet and fresh.

    Babs


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    strawberryxxx #42 [url] [-]

    Posts: 2895
    Saturday, 03-05-11 22:43
    Hi Babs,

    I think you'll find it's parsley that's used to treat bad breath. Coriander may help,too, though. I do know it's very good for you in lots of ways - it cuts cholesterol; is helpful in diabetes; is good in treating insomnia and anxiety, and I think it's also good for the liver and digestion, as well as being a diuretic. It's a really good thing to eat, actually!

    Strawbs


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    yvette #43 [url] [-]

    Posts: 216
    Tuesday, 03-08-11 11:59
    strawberryxxx wrote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Hi Denise,

    Yes I've seen cacik done the way you've described, but I prefer it with the cucumber grated and the skin left on. I think it tastes more 'cucumbery' and the skin adds colour. And I prefer the texture when it's grated, though having it the chopped way ( and with ice cubes) is more refreshing in the summer. I've noticed in Greece they tend to chop their cucumbers for cacik (or should I say Tzaziki! tut tut )

    I suppose it's all down to personal preference, really. Actually, I'm going to make some today (I need a garlic overload for my sore throat and cough!) When I make it just for the two of us I put about 3 cloves of garlic in it, but a lot of people find that too much, so when I've ever made it for other people I only use about one clove.

    Do you use thyme in yours? Ertie insists upon it.....".don't forget the tymeeee!" I've no idea what he'd do without his 'tymeee'!

    I always sprinkle dill on top, too, or sometimes mint. By the way, what yogurt do you use to make yours? The thick one or normal one?



    Strawbs I did some of that cacik how you described and it was tops. I grated it like you said and hope you don't mind but did a search and that is the right way to do it

    http://mideastfood.about.com/od/dipsandsauces/r/cacikrecipe.htm

    Thanks for that girl Everyone loved it and I did it for my turkish friends so was well chuffed hehe

    Yvetter



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    pixiestoes #44 [url] [-]

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    Monday, 04-04-11 22:13
    Any tips on making failproof baklava? Thanks girls.




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    scarlett #45 [url] [-]

    Posts: 177
    Wednesday, 04-06-11 11:02
    Oh! Who in their right mind could be bothered to make baklava?!

    M&S sell it, as do all the Turkish supermarkets! And if you like baklava theirs is always perfect, too! I don't see the point of faffing about with all that filo pastry, nuts etc.......what for when you can buy it? And different types too!

    I don't dislike baklava (though it's too sweet for me, really) and I would only eat one or two pieces - not because it's fattening - I just find it so sweet.

    Do you want to make it yourself for a special reason?

    Strawbs

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    porkchop #46 [url] [-]

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    Wednesday, 04-06-11 11:59
    Do marks sell it? i never knew that. i wouldnt mind giving it a go, i like cooking sometimes.

    xx


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    Barbarababe #47 [url] [-]

    Posts: 100
    Wednesday, 04-06-11 13:39
    Hello Strawbs

    I rather enjoy cooking , particularly new recipes so baklava would be fun to make if you don't mind me saying so. I often bake a cake at home on the weekends and I find it very satisfying, I'm an old fashioned girl at heart and like to learn new recipes. I can't wait for the day when I cook for my chap when he comes to England. I have a long list of recipes I've devised for when he comes. Would you like me to post it up? I have some very unusual recipes on there. I enjoy a task.

    Babs


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    pixiestoes #48 [url] [-]

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    Monday, 04-11-11 04:57
    yes please barbarababe

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    scarlett #49 [url] [-]

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    Tuesday, 04-12-11 05:24
    Hi Babs,

    Would you like to come round to my place and cook for us? I HATE a task!

    I've got two boxes of tomatoes just turned up - so if you have any recipe ideas for toms - do let me know!

    I know how to make tomato omelette (and salads/sandwiches/pizzas!) but I'm not sure what else I can do with them?

    Any ideas?

    Strawbs

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    Meowcat #50 [url] [-]

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    Tuesday, 04-12-11 08:32
    Throw em at someone????


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    Re: Turkish Cookery Tips & Recipes

    Post  Admin on Sun Apr 24, 2011 8:41 pm

    .Turkish cookery tips
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    scarlett #51 [url] [-]

    Posts: 177
    Monday, 04-18-11 08:15

    strawberryxxx wrote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Hi again, Babs,

    I take it you mean the long puffy bread they serve hot, and is usually sprinkled with sesame seeds? Hmmm....I haven't tried cooking that yet. By the way, it's called Lavas (pronounced as 'lavash') It's my favourite dipping bread too, but you really need a large wood-burning stove to cook it properly. You could improvise and use a garden stove filled with wood, but it's all a bit tricky. I only eat lavas with meze, and there are a couple of good restaurants I know in London and Surrey who do great lavas, but a lot of Turkish restaurants don't seem to bother - so my guess is that it's hard work! Haha! It is lovely, though, and I think almost every restaurant Ertie and I went into up and down Turkey served us up lavas for free with our mezes. Personally, if I was doing meze at home I'd just buy some crackers for dipping! Or some really nice crusty bread, and I'd heat it up in the oven - I'm not crazy about pitta bread (in fact I don't think it's Turkish is it?) and I find it it a bit chewy if it isn't piping hot (I like CRUNCH) I do enjoy cooking, but I don't like hard work - and I think bread can be tricky - especially lavas, but I could be wrong. If you're only making it to dip into mezzes I'd be inclined to serve the mezze how they do in the authentic restaurants in Turkey. For example, really good restaurants often serve their Hummus hot and pour warm melted butter over it and then sprinkle it with nuts (pistachios usually) It sounds like heart attack material, and one dip is about a million cals haha, but it is absolutely gorgeous. Once eaten like that you won't want it any other way.

    Another heart attack material dessert is Kanafeh. Again, it's served hot and is about a million cals a bite (I swear I gained half a stone overnight eating that in Turkey!) but it is delicious. You need to buy some of that Kadayif pastry (it's like strings - similar to shredded wheat) you can buy it in most frozen counters of Turkish supermarkets. All you do is lay some in a small earthenware bowl (you'll use that as the serving dish) and cover it with unsalted butter. Bake it in the oven for about 10 minutes, then spread some cream cheese on top (Philadelphia will do) and cover with more of the stringy pastry. Put it back in the oven and cook for about 8 minutes. Meanwhile, make a syrup of water, sugar and rosewater, then sprinkle it liberally over the pastry and put it back in the oven for about 5 more minutes. You can also sprinkle orange food colouring on the top of the part-baked pastry - it just makes it look prettier. Once cooked sprinkle a handful of chopped pistachios and walnuts on top, and serve with thick clotted cream. Then call an ambulance - just in case! Nooo, it is lovely - really. But it is very very fattening. Makes a nice treat for a special occasion though.

    Strawbs




    Bumped it up for you, Yvette!

    Strawbs









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    Meowcat #52 [url] [-]

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    Monday, 04-18-11 10:51
    Yve, you do know you can only have one teaspoonfull........400 calories a sniff

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    Barbarababe #53 [url] [-]

    Posts: 100
    Saturday, 04-23-11 12:13
    Hello Ladies

    Does anyone know what that hot red chilli dip is called that they serve with your starters? I rather fancy that but I'm not sure how to make it as the cecipes all seem to differ.

    Babs



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    Re: Turkish Cookery Tips & Recipes

    Post  Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 8:25 pm

    I thought I'd bump the recipe thread and resurrect it. Aah, poor old Babs! I wonder what's happened to her?!

    Anyway, if anyone fancies putting a recipe up, please do. It doesn't have to be Turkish (you only need tomato paste, aubergines and peppers for Turkish food, anyway! What a Face ) More or less, anyway....sometimes beans. Exciting! Beans, rice and yogurt. With loads of bread to fill you up.

    Anyway, any recipes will be welcome!

    Strawbs
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    Turkishheartdrop

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    Re: Turkish Cookery Tips & Recipes

    Post  Turkishheartdrop on Tue Jul 05, 2011 9:37 pm

    Yes what did happen to her? She was such an old dear but was never sure if she was a batty Suspect I liked reding her posts tho....................can't you contact her somehow? There's a few still awol.......

    Hope they fins us here again
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    Boreks

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    Re: Turkish Cookery Tips & Recipes

    Post  Boreks on Tue Jul 05, 2011 11:56 pm

    What she like? I will find her for you babys.

    I can cook anything you want also Wink Wink Wink

    Kisses babys

    SEXY SULTAN x0x0x0x Wink

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    Re: Turkish Cookery Tips & Recipes

    Post  Guest on Wed Jul 06, 2011 7:25 am

    Boreks, your posts are a load of baliks Very Happy

    Ruby

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