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    Winter Time in Turkey

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    ruby

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    Winter Time in Turkey

    Post  ruby on Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:33 am

    When I stayed in Marmaris during the winter, I used to have to get out nearly every day, even if it was for a short walk just to break up the day. Winter time can be very boring and tedious and even a short walk to the local Baker's seemed like the highlight of the day.

    Well one day I decided to have a drive out to Turgut, it is a village about 20K from Marmaris, its where all the jeep safari's go during the summer months, but of course in the winter the stunning scenery is totally unspoilt by tourists.

    Anyway, for those folk who dont know Marmaris or its surrounding areas, Turgut is a small village with a mosque, a small traditional school, a couple of craft shops, a two small markets (supermarkets without the 'super') Shocked.

    Turgut is very near to the beautiful waterfall where again in the summer hoards of tourists cram into jeeps to walk up the nature trail to swim in the waterfall. You have to pass over a dried up stream, but in the winter the stream is about 2-3 inches deep. I was driving and thought, 'no problem I can drive through this little stream'. Guess what, oh no I couldnt. I got stuck in the stream, the tyres were spinning and stones, mud and small rocks were being dispatched all over the car. I was panicking thinking I was never going to get the car out of the stream.

    I used to always carry blankets in the boot of the car just in case of an emergency, so I got out the car stepping into the water, went to the boot and got a blanket out and placed it under the rear tyres. It took me about ten mins to release the bloody car out of that stream and I never returned back to it during the winter. Embarassed

    So much for my boring winter day in Turkey, wish I had stayed in and watched Eastenders on Digiturk Razz

    Ruby
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    Turkishheartdrop

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    Re: Winter Time in Turkey

    Post  Turkishheartdrop on Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:12 pm

    you wont do that again will ya LOL............your like my mate she has everything in the boot of her car....blankets...maps...kettle...foof drink...matches...and she lives in the city centre LOL....
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    Maria

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    Re: Winter Time in Turkey

    Post  Maria on Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:22 pm

    Ruby its dangerous to try and drive over streams even if they look a few inches you never know how deep they are What a Face

    People have died doing that and got swept away and stuck in the car! affraid

    Maria
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    hyatum

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    Re: Winter Time in Turkey

    Post  hyatum on Fri Nov 18, 2011 5:25 am

    Hi Ruby

    I think you were very adventurous... we need to get pushed out of our comfort zones to learn new things!! and you did totally the right thing to get some traction on the tyres....4x2 wheel drive vehicles are mostly rear wheel drive (RWD) so they are good for driving on hard surfaces, but take them off-road and they struggle because there is no power to the front wheels so when you hit a sandy patch or river etc. the vehicle just 'digs in'. And the more you accelerate the faster they dig... lol! Maria you are absolutely right, rivers can be pretty dangerous especially if they are fast running and there is a chance of waters rising. The water can make the tyres 'float' and get carried away downstream.

    We cross rivers, streams and swamps on a regular basis and I love driving through the Okavango swamps in Botswana. The waters are so clean and fresh but you dare not let the engine stall in the middle of a crossing lol! The water sometimes comes right half way up the doors in our 4x4's and it's always a competition to see who crosses first so we can take other pics of the rest of the terrified crew crossing. My sister is really scared of elephants and every-time we see eles elephant in a crossing we pretend that we are stuck....The look on her face is worth millions. lol! Here at home I have to contend with horrible muddy waters and my car looks permanently as though it has been shat on by a giant mammoth.

    I just have to share this story: On one trip to Botswana our 'mottled crew' arrived at a log bridge which traversed into a National Park. Traveling in front of us had been a group of Pakistanis in a mini-bus, who were clearly not too interested in game viewing. As we arrived at the bridge the they all pulled out their prayer mats and tried to find a way to engage with the direction of Mecca and start their midday prayers. None of us could cross the bridge as the locals had decided on that day to 'jus pleez waait oone sekond we feeex eet'!! Of course time in Africa has F@#$- All meaning so hours went by and the bridge fixing was just going on and on. Sleep A log would be placed and then lots of talking and banter and then sit-down to discuss if it went in the right way and all of us were becoming very anxious to cross. It was a really hot day .......THEN .......... scratch one of the workers nonchalantly pulled off his very dirty gum-boot, dipped it in the river and had a long thirsty slug out of his improvised vesicle. A very loud comment came from one of our crew 'this is the African version of drinking champagne out of a glass slipper'. There was tremendous laughter. With that, all hell broke loose, and there appeared a hale of smoke from the 'old' section of the bridge where we were standing. The bridge had caught alight and none other than my nephew had carelessly dropped his discarded fag into the top of a stump on the bridge. A thousand gum boots came raining down with water onto both the bridge and my nephew (who was additionally rewarded with a few slaps from the workers bounce ) and the prayer mats and the panic-stricken Pakistanis were up-ended with all their massive cooking pots into the river. If camels can sing, that scene was like the Apocalypse. Needless to say the bridge was completed helluva speedily after that...... but whenever I think of crossing rivers Rubes...it reminds me of that fiasco. lol!

    Have a good night and never fear to go venturing Ruby! You might get to drink champagne out of a gumboot whilst floating on a prayer mat with a pot(ty) on your head. geek

    Nicks
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    ruby

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    Re: Winter Time in Turkey

    Post  ruby on Fri Nov 18, 2011 7:43 am

    Oh Nicks I can just envisage that scene, what a combination, you've got people praying, the locals working to South African time schedule which is worse than any Turkish time period which I know is hard to believe, but very true Surprised

    Then the guy having his glass of champers SA style, its a wonder they dont catch a dose of bilharzia affraid I can well imagine that happening as I actually witnessed black people eating freshly delivered dirt, to say I was shocked has to be an understatement, but apparently, its commonplace affraid

    Then the disgraced nephew having a couple of slaps Laughing At least it got the locals working at double speed which would still be a slow pace Surprised

    Next time I drive in Turkey I will ensure that I have champagne, prayer mats and pots to hand (just in case Laughing ), just dont fancy a swim with them all at the same time though bom

    Rubes

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